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Khalid Swift
Khalid Swift

What is Four Bar Software Norton and How to Use It?



What is Four Bar Software Norton and How to Use It?




Four Bar Software Norton is a set of programs developed by Robert L. Norton, a professor of mechanical engineering and author of several textbooks on machine design. The software allows users to design and analyze four-bar linkages, which are mechanisms that consist of four rigid bars connected by joints. Four-bar linkages are widely used in engineering applications, such as cranks, rockers, levers, and couplers.




Four Bar Software Norton



The software includes FOURBAR for Windows, FOURBAR Student Edition, FIVEBAR for Windows, and SLIDER for Windows. Each program has a graphical user interface that lets users input the dimensions and parameters of the linkage, such as link lengths, joint angles, angular velocities, and torques. The software then calculates and displays the kinematic and dynamic properties of the linkage, such as position, velocity, acceleration, force, power, and efficiency. The software also provides animation and plotting features that help users visualize the motion and behavior of the linkage.


The software is intended for educational purposes and can be used by students and instructors of mechanical engineering courses. The software can help students learn the principles of kinematics and dynamics of mechanisms, as well as practice their problem-solving skills. The software can also help instructors demonstrate and explain various concepts and examples of four-bar linkages.


The software can be downloaded from various websites that offer free or trial versions[^1^] [^2^] [^3^]. The software requires Windows operating system and a minimum of 16 MB of RAM. The software is easy to install and use, and comes with a user manual and a help file that provide instructions and tips on how to operate the software.


Examples of four-bar linkages[edit]


Four-bar linkages can be used for many mechanical purposes, including to:


  • convert rotational motion to reciprocating motion (e.g., pumpjack examples below)



  • convert reciprocating motion to rotational motion (e.g., bicycle examples below)



  • constrain motion (e.g., knee joint and suspension examples below)



  • magnify force (e.g., parrotfish jaw examples below)



Pumpjack[edit]


A pumpjack is a device that extracts oil from a well by using a four-bar linkage to convert the rotary motion of a motor into the reciprocating motion of a pump rod. The four-bar linkage consists of a ground link, an input crank, an output rocker, and a floating link. The input crank is driven by a motor and rotates in a full circle. The output rocker is connected to the pump rod and oscillates in a limited angle. The floating link connects the input crank and the output rocker and transmits the force and motion between them.[^4^]


Bicycle[edit]


A bicycle is a vehicle that uses a four-bar linkage to convert the reciprocating motion of the pedals into the rotational motion of the rear wheel. The four-bar linkage consists of a ground link, an input slider, an output crank, and a floating link. The ground link is fixed to the bicycle frame and supports the rear wheel. The input slider is attached to the pedal and moves along a straight line. The output crank is connected to the rear wheel and rotates in a full circle. The floating link connects the input slider and the output crank and transmits the force and motion between them.[^2^]


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